Posts tagged vegetarian

BOOK REVIEW: Skinny Bitch in the Kitch

Skinny Bitch in the Kitch (Rory Freedman and Kim Bardouin) – 2007 (excerpt)

The Bitches are Back!

For those of you who’ve been following this blog for a while, you’ll remember how excited (and grossed out!) I was by the book Skinny Bitch, a treatise on eating vegan and treating yourself like the queen (or king) you really are. (read the review here) Soon after turning the last page of that book, I ordered the new companion book, Skinny Bitch in the Kitch from the library and sat back to wait, and wait, and wait, for it to come. Guess it’s just as popular as the original!

While I did enjoy the book, it lacked the hard-hitting feeling of the first book. Much of this is due to the different format. After all, this is a cookbook, so the focus is on recipes, not pep-talks. I guess they figure they’ve already hit you over the head, no need to do it again. I read through it in an afternoon, copied the recipes I liked, and sent it on its way. No grossed out dreams the next day, not even a squeamish look at the supermarket meat aisle. Perhaps after the first book, my expectations were too high… I actually MISSED this feeling of being punched in the stomach, and felt like I’d been let down. The book sort of assumes that you’ve already read Skinny Bitch, and for those that haven’t you’re relegated to three pages of summary and an order to get off your ass and purchase that book too.

That being said, the recipes look very good, and admirably, they stick to a relatively normal palette of ingredients that you probably already own (or should). And they look pretty tasty too. Most don’t travel to the culinary ends of the world, but are instead vegan revamps of classic recipes. The organization was funny and there are some cute little quotes peppered here and there for good measure.

Overall, I liked the book, but felt that I’d have liked it better with a little less expectation. I found myself photocopying chapters from the first book and handing them out to everyone I knew while breathlessly expounding on the vegan lifestyle. That won’t be happening with this one. As a producer in the movie business, I know well the daunting challenge these ladies faced in creating the sequel to such a popular book. Truly, living up to high expectation is never easy. If you’ve never read either, I recommend getting the two books together and trying out the recipes while you read Skinny Bitch and other food is totally turning your stomach. That way, the yummy vegan meals you prepare will taste that much better, and will have a greater chance of ending up in your regular cooking repertoire.

Advertisements

Comments (1) »

BOOK REVIEW: It’s a Long Road to a Tomato

It’s a Long Road to a Tomato (Google Books) Keith Stewart (2005)

Any home gardener out there know that the title of this book is indeed truthful. For every fruit or vegetable harvested from your garden, hours of time and plenty of resources went into cultivation. As Keith Stewart so eloquently describes, things get even more extreme when you turn to commercial gardening, and even more so when you commit to gardening organically.

This book was extremely entertaining and educational. What I liked best was the honest depiction of the amount of work it takes to be a farmer in the 21st century. Next time you go to a farmers’ market, take a moment to talk to a vendor about their farm: you’ll really appreciate how hard they work when you hear stories of 4am waking and hand weeding in a commitment to earth-friendly growing practices! Suddenly, paying $0.50 more for an avocado doesn’t seem like such a bad deal.

The story is a personal one, outlining Mr. Stewart’s journey from city-dwelling ad man to wildly successful organic farmer at NYC’s most famous farmers market. You’ll read about the stringent hoops one must jump through to call produce organic, the unglamorous life of digging in the dirt, current governmental and policy landscapes for the independent farmer, managing a staff of farm workers, and many interesting little unrelated tales from the journey. When the cover quotes “you’ll laugh out loud”, they aren’t kidding.

I was inspired from reading this book to plant some garlic, which Mr. Stewart praises as perhaps the best plant on earth. True to his word, the plants have done very well even under my inexperienced care. It was nice to see his progression from a hobbyist’s garden to a commercial venture… it makes the leap seem that much more tangible for those of us looking to break into that market.

All in all, I have nothing but praise for this book. If you’ve ever considered growing professionally, you really should read this book first. Not that it will scare you off (on the contrary, I found it very inspiring), but it WILL give you a much better idea of the things you need (a garden, a good accountant, and a dream) and the things you had better not need (like sleep and a social life!). And even if you aren’t trying to change careers, it will help you connect the food you eat to its source, and encourage you to buy local and support your local independent farmers as they battle the giant conglomerates who control our global food supply. So go on, savor that local tomato, it will be so much sweeter!

Leave a comment »

Cooking: Refining the Recipes

Here’s a few pics of my “new and improved” Banana Pie, now featuring Ginger and mixed berries. By eliminating the extra juice and adding fruits that I foraged and some shredded ginger, I was able to both increase the sliceability of the pie and add a crucial taste dimension. It kept very well covered at room temperature for a day. If I had a fridge, I’m sure it would have kept longer and tasted good chilled.

Yum. This was a drastic improvement over the past recipe, though both were tasty. This time, I added: 1/2 ginger root, shredded; 10 blackberries; 3 ripe bananas, mashed; 2 passion fruits (foraged); flax seeds (enough to coat top of pie); and graham cereal to top (a nice thick coat, added after cooking, to cover the browning of the bananas). Cook covered for 1 hour. Make sure you shred the ginger very fine, and mix well or spread evenly, unless you like your desserts “spicy”.

Crab and Artichoke Frittata. Next, I attacked the egg “jello” recipe, hoping to solve a little of the texture problem. This time, I used: three eggs, lightly beaten, but not totally homogenized; 1 small can crab meat; 1/2 can quartered artichoke hearts (not the marinated kind, the kind packed in water); two pinches crushed sea salt. Cook covered for 1 and 1/2 hours. The result? The eggs did have a slightly better texture, but I’m thinking that the texture is something iherent in the solar cooking process. The color issue did not improve (eggs turn brown in the solar cooker), but the result tasted good, especially when an additional pinch of sea salt was sprinkled on top before serving. No pictures here, as it wasn’t too photogenic, but it was a solid meal, and my cats went nuts for it, (and ended up eating a few human sized portions of it while I wasn’t looking!)

For a hearty side dish, I prepared carrot and black eyed pea succotash. Very simple, few ingredients, and tasted and smalled great. It was so easy I almost feel guilty calling it a recipe. I used: 1 can sliced carrots; 1 can black eyed peas; 1 t sea salt; 1 T sesame seeds. Mix all, and cook covered for 45 minutes, or until hot. Here’s the (predictable) result, which needed no extra seasoning to be palatable:

So there you have it: three “new” recipes for summer cooking fun. As I learn more about urban foraging (more about this in my next post) I am trying to incorporate locally found foods into my recipes. We’ll see how it goes.

Comments (1) »

Solar Panel Installation (and Eating Your Neighbor’s Lawn)

Great news!  It’s been a while since I posted, but there are a slew of recipes that you’ll be seeing added over the next few days.  As few things in life turn out perfectly the first time, I have been refining the previous recipes and trying a few new ones, side dishes mostly.  Most have been successful, but more on that later.  Great news, you ask?  Yes!  I’ve just signed up to get certified as a solar panel installer.  This means that for the next eight months, I’ll be working toward completing the necessary coursework and study hours for the National certification exam, and hopefully getting some practical experience working with panels along the way.  You might be asking why this should interest you in any way… well, since I love to share, and since writing about things helps me to learn, I mean really LEARN things, I’ll be keeping a sort of study diary on this site.  So if you’re wondering where to start on that whole “watts vs. volts” issue, or if you need a little brush up on your high school physics or electronics (and who doesn’t?), keep checking back often to see if I’ve covered the topic here.  I’ll be using the SEI’s textbook on photovoltaic installation and repair, which is pretty much the best on out there as far as I can tell.  Class starts Wednesday, so more about that then!

In the meantime, I’ve been reading a lot about urban foraging.  It’s a huge topic with relatively few available references.   But starting with Christopher Nyerges’ excellent Wild Foods and Useful Plants guides and also covering specific guides to my local SoCal area, I’ve been out every morning hunting for food.  And it’s everywhere!  Did you know that most of the plants in your garden, never mind those that professional landscapers use in public places, are edible in one way or another?  Geraniums, pansies, daylilies, lavender, nasturtium, chrysanthemums, marigolds, roses and more all make tasty snacks alone or blended into recipes.  You can even replace some of the gourmet items in your pantry with wild alternatives, adding an exotic flair to your cooking.  For example, nasturtium seeds make an excellent caper substitute when pickled, and you can make jellies straight from your yard instead of store-bought marmalades. 

If you’d like to find out more about the plants of your area, I’d highly recommend you check out a book that specializes in your area and start looking for wild foods every time you go out the front door.  I have to admit that though I’d never even noticed what was edible before, now I’m finding myself distracted trying to walk down any street, looking at the possibilities.  And the fruit you pick is SO much sweeter than the one you buy, even if just in principle.  The book I just finished Edible and Useful Plants of California (can’t remember off-hand who wrote it) also included many great anecdotes about the Native American food and medicinal uses of various plants.  When moving away from reliance on the grid, you’d do well to know a bit about the native flora of your community.  And I hardly need to spell out its importance after grid-crash, except to point out that it will be the few months following immediate aid and before people’s sowed crops mature that will be hardest for individuals to survive.  If you know about edible plants, then you can sit happily munching on your neighbors’ lawns while they sit inside their houses panicking.  You might even get an “I told you so” out between bites.  How’s that for sweet justice!  Until next time, happy foraging!

Comments (4) »

Solar Cooking Roundup: Two New Recipes

As mentioned previously, I haven’t been getting out the oven as often lately, as it’s been unseasonably cool and cloudy here. But, as if magically anticipating that summer was right around the corner, a few days back the thermometer jumped about 30 degrees. Yikes, it is triple digit hot!

So, of course the first thing I did was pull out the box cooker. After a yum but “haven’t I tried this before?” few meals of roasted red sweet peppers with cheese, it was time to do a little culinary exploration. So this past weekend, I fired up the “grill” and made two new recipes.

First up:

Banana Nectarine “Pie”

3 bananas, roughly broken into slices
1 nectarine, chopped
2 T flax seeds (for nutrients and “crunch”)
1/8 cup Sunny Delight (next time I’ll skip this)
1/4 cup honey graham cereal

To make, mix all ingredients except graham cereal into pan. Cover and bake for 30 minutes, or until the bananas smell super sweet and mash easily. The flax seeds will swell to a larger size, too, so you know they will not be too hard. Bring out of the sun and mash the bananas with a fork, stirring to mix everything well. Allow to thicken for about ten minutes. During that time, crumble graham cereal into the bottom of ramekins/ cups and crumble more for the tops. Spoon mix into each cup and top with more crumbled graham cereal.

This recipe turned out well taste-wise. Next time I might skip the Sunny D (there was a lot of natural liquid in the mix after cooking) and add a little cinnamon before cooking, but it was also good as is. The only disconcerting part was that the bananas looked kind of brown in the pot, but covering the top with graham solved that aesthetic dilemma. Easily makes enough for two people.

Today, I tried a different take on my pepper lunch:

Chili and Celery with Mango

2 large green Anaheim Chili peppers
2 long stalks celery
1 sweet red pepper
Annie’s Naturals Organic Balsamic Vinaigrette Marinade
1 large mango

To make, cut and deseed the chilis and sweet pepper into pinky finger size strips, and chop the two stalks of celery. Pour a little marinade over the mixed veggies in the pan, and put in the sun for about an hour. At that point, I checked the progress, added a bit more marinade, gave everything a good shake to cover, and returned the pan to the oven for another 1/2 hour. Bring everything inside, add the mango (chopped) to the mix and stir together. Serve immediately.

Yum. Of all the dishes I’ve made so far, this was my favorite. At first, I was nervous about adding the mango to what smelled like a very hearty mix, but it worked perfectly, giving everything a cool taste even on this scorcher of a day. And it needed no seasoning either, though I’d imagine it would be good with a sprinkle of coarse sea salt sprinkled on top. This recipe will make it into the cookbook. Makes enough to feed one VERY well, or two for a light lunch or appetizer.

And here’s the finished result:


Now for a nap to work off all that gourmet eating! =)

Leave a comment »

The World is My Table: Edible Flowers

Flowers are so lovely, keeping the world in near-perpetual color, and providing us in time with our fruits and vegetables. But flowers can be nutritious, too. So if you’re garnishing a plate in the near future, consider using a locally available edible garnish that looks great, encourages awareness of wild foods, and probably comes for free! Of course, be sure to wash well, and avoid picking flowers from along busy roadways.

If you’re looking for a few suggestions, check out this edible flower list from HomeCooking.com, and also this separate list of poisonous plants to avoid on your forage. Then check out this article from About.com on the tastes and uses of different common wild flowers. Well educated, you’re ready to hit the trail and spice up your evening cuisine.

Chive Blossom Borage Flower Rose Blossom

Of course, in these days of manicured lawns and ornamental gardening, you probably won’t even have to hit the trail to find what you seek. Roses, pansies, and nasturtiums are all edible, so you can plant your beds with produce that’s extra easy on the eyes. Never mind the possibilities of fruit trees, marigolds, lavender, day-lilies, hibiscus, chamomile, and chives. It’s a bloomin’ cornucopia out there, so grab a basket and head for the backyard.

Here’s an excellent list of edible flowers with pictures.

Leave a comment »

The Law of Unintended Consequences

I’ll admit it: when I got the book reviewed last week, Skinny Bitch, I had no real intention of becoming vegan (well, no more than usual, anyway), I simply wanted to learn more about healthy food choices and eating a plant-based diet. Vegan diets are good for the whole planet? I had no idea. But now, one week later, I’m slower than your Great Granny at the grocery store, reading all the labels, trying to remember whether ingredients were on the Good or Evil list. The other day, I ate soy yogurt, for pete’s sake! True, when I read Fast Food Nation a few years back, it inspired a similar quest to eliminate fast food from my life, but I’m not usually one to just jump wholeheartedly on a bandwagon. What’s going on?

Ingredient List

The book recommends not going cold turkey if you’re used to a carnivorous diet, but being kind of an accidental semi-vegetarian most of my life (my parents never could figure out why I preferred asparagus to ice cream at ten), I figured I was close enough to try. Rather than set up for failure, I simply aimed to reduce as much as possible with each individual food choice, and keep a food journal to track progress. One week in, it’s been pretty enlightening.

From the first day, I could feel a difference. I stuck vegan that day, but already I could tell it wouldn’t be cold turkey for me. Oh no, I’m still thoroughly hooked on milk products. The next day, I allowed myself cheese on top of pasta, and ate some peanut M&Ms after dinner. Okay, opiates, refined sugars, and artificial colors. Could be worse. Day three must have been, like the book predicted, when my body started to digest itself, which although it sounds awful, they promised was a good thing, once you expel all the toxins and stop feeling like crap. Which I definitely did on and off all day. Already, I could feel the direct effect of putting butter on my wheat toast in the morning, and of eating a bean and cheese burrito from Del Taco. Buouyed by the book’s promise, I stuck it out and promised myself I’d stop eating so much junk. Yesterday, I was back on my feet, and feeling good. Tried soy yogurt, in a moment of particular devotion. Ummm… not going to make the regular shopping list yet. But almond and rice milks will, for sure. Suddenly, I understand why everyone at Whole Foods looks so great. Ralph’s (Safeway) is definitely NOT vegan friendly. To be honest, it’s no less expensive either.

Strangely, the first thing I’ve noticed about this “food vision quest” I’m on is that my skin brightened up immediately, and has been getting softer by the day. Not bad for an added bonus! Those little enzymes must be hard at work putting things back together again. Also, in an effort to stop drinking so much soda and caffeine, I’ve been exploring the world of teas. I discovered Tulsi Ginger Tea (caffeine free) from Organic India, and it’s love at first sight. It reminds me of Celestial seasonings Tension Tamer tea, minty and rejuvenating. And the literature included listed so many health benefits of Tulsi (“Holy Basil”) that I couldn’t believe I’d never heard of it before, especially since it said it had been revered in India for darn near 5000 years!

Tulsi (Holy Basil) Tea

So there you have it. Though this blog is about getting off the grid, I realized how much better for the planet and for my local community it would be to eat locally produced vegan foods. In the end, the foods you eat DO have a huge impact on the footprint you leave. I wasn’t planning on cleansing, or making a definitive vegetarian choice this week, but Skinny Bitch’s arrival nudged me (with a cattle prod) to get started if I ever wanted to stop being a half-assed foodie hypocrite. So I am. And me, my glowing complexion, and my newfound tea are loving every minute of it. You can do it, too. Read Skinny Bitch to find out how forgoing animal products will save you and the environment and help avert the global food and energy crises. If you haven’t read it already, read Fast Food Nation. That should put you over the edge, for sure! Or pick a hard-hitting book on some other topic and scare yourself into making that change you’ve been toying with. After all, in our entropic world, building your spirit will require you to actively participate, and there’s no time like the present to start. In fact, that’s the only time you’ll ever start anything. So do it now!

Leave a comment »

%d bloggers like this: